Check out Ruiz Burgos' epic DVD covers for this gangster flick collection
http://ruizburgos.blogspot.com.es

Two artists have brought to life of some of the most beloved locales in the magical worlds of fantasy fiction. The exquisite pieces—created in Photoshop by artists Peter and Radu behind the Etsy shop The Green Dragon Inn—offer escapes to King’s Landing, Diagon Alley, Rivendell, and other imaginary places from the Game of Thrones, Harry Potter and The Lord of the Rings series. Because what book and art lover wouldn’t want to deck out their walls with gorgeous renderings of their favorite fictional jaunts?
https://www.etsy.com/shop/TheGreenDragonInn

Born in 1965, artist Ikenaga Yasunari's serene and soothing portraits of modern women evoke a dreamy nostalgia through their faded golden hues and elegant floating poses. Using a Menso brush, mineral pigments, and soot ink on linen cloth, Yasunari continues the ancient tradition of Nihonga painting while simultaneously bringing modern elements to play, such as present-day clothing styles and floral textile designs. The result is both beautiful and melancholy, capturing the timelessness of the Nihonga style as well as its dimming presence through the years.
http://ikenaga-yasunari.com/

Artist Keith P. Rein manipulates the viewers expectations of sex and nudity. Some of his compositions could be pornographic. Women with mouths full, faces glazed in bliss. But instead of the expected — in their face is a hotdog. An ice cream cone. His beautiful ladies bold, colored with the patina of summer cheer. What you find in Rein’s work are delightful fables of summer barbecues and candy treats. Sex is implied, of course — the hardcore sort. But there is a playfulness to it all, a healthy dose of whimsy and humor that keeps the viewer smiling.

Shared from http://www.juxtapoz.com/erotica/evil-tender-in-conversation-with-keith-p-rein

Franz von Bayros, born in 1866, was a commercial artist, illustrator and painter from Austria. He was best known for his controversial Tales at the Dressing Table portfolio, a virtuosic yet wildly provocative collection of erotic images that still strike us as bizarre and even unnatural despite having been created a century ago. He is one of the first artists who could be described as using fetish themes in his art, essentially becoming the first “fetish artist.” Take a closer look at any of these beautifully-rendered drawings and you’ll see that Von Bayros’ ideas are a little off the beaten path—bondage, zoophilia, the usual.

http://mackeeperapp2.zeobit.com/landings/land/1/ron_cleanprot17/index.php?affid=mzb_206.21840911.1409853442.2.mzb&utm_source=adcsh&utm_medium=popunder&utm_campaign=mk_adcsh_other_us_subscn&utm_term=&utm_content=&userDefiner=mzb_2304&installer=&trt=29_212611&alert=1&tid_ext=103897
Curated by Lauren YS

“Klimt was exceptionally animal-like. His body exuded a peculiar odor. As a woman, one was really afraid of him.” This is a quote from Hilde Roth, one of the models that was prone to hanging about Gustav Klimt's studio in packs. The artist we all know best for gorgeous, gilded paintings like “The Kiss" was also very frank in his eroticism—he painted his models nude first, and then painted on clothes and surrounded them with the spiralling golden atmospheres we ailgn him with know. Apparently Klimt was also known for wearing a long robe with no undergarments. Nice. Klimt’s erotic oeuvre ranges from figure drawings to wildly imaginative fantasms, from the mythical nymphs frolicking in goldfish ponds to tangles of sketched, nude lovers to the pretty maidens threatened by forest animals. Vienna’s most well-known artist didn’t get that title just by being a great draftsmen— these paintings exude a kind of sexiness that is particular only to this golden age of erotic expression in Vienna.

http://www.eroti-cart.com/gustav-klimt-c-63_65
Curated by Lauren YS
Shared from www.juxtapoz.com

Kolomon Moser was born in Vienna and studied at the Wiener Akademie and the Kunstgewerbeschule, where he also taught as a professor later in his life. While Moser designed architecture, furniture, jewelry and graphics, his paintings and drawings are most well known for their lines and repetitive motifs of classical design. If you walk around Vienna for long enough, you’ll notice that Moser’s aesthetic has permeated through many channels, a mixture of classical Greek and Roman art smoothed out by the flowing spirals of the art nouveau aesthetic. His erotic drawings are much less focused on design, however, and instead display a virtuosic approach toward shape, color and pose. Moser’s figures are strong and forthcoming, expressing a young, athletic sexuality in tune with nature and looking toward the future.

Curated by Lauren YS
http://www.neuegalerie.org/collection/artist-profiles/koloman-moser

This series by photographer Thomas Herbrich is staggeringly brilliant. Over a period of three years, he culled his Smoke series down from some 100,000 photographs of beautiful plumes of smoke to just 20 that he was satisfied with, all of which were taken using camera flash speeds of 1/10000 or faster to discover unusual, sometimes recognizable shapes in the organic patterns.
http://www.herbrich.com/

Shared from http://www.lostateminor.com/2014/09/04/astounding-photos-smoke-plumes-3-years-100000-shots-making/

Looking at Tonya Corkey’s art you might be mistaken for thinking these are just ordinary canvases with a bit of paint splattered onto them. But look closely and you’ll realize that Corkey has developed a very peculiar way of making her portraits. She uses dryer lint. Her latest project is called ‘See You in the Future’ and ‘takes inspiration from found vintage photographs of anonymous people’. Each portrait involves a heavy layer of lint, each one in different hues to bring on an incredible shadowy effect. Wondering why she uses lint? Corkey explains:

‘My work hybridizes the discarded material of lint with the second hand image – the iconic school photograph – to conceptualize my interests. Materiality conceptually layers the work. As a byproduct of society, lint consists of fibers, hair, dead skin and other debris, and thus directly referencing people and their daily activity. Lint and cast off photographs are both discarded materials – materials that reflect the idea of a decaying memory. Our desire for memory in absence is triggered by sensations of smell and touch, a trait of my work. The void spaces of raw canvas in works such as,“Unknown #1” are intended to reflect memory, described through the standing out of key features: the eyes, mouth and hair. The viewer’s mind fills in these void spaces in the same way a photograph would’.

http://www.tonyacorkey.com/
Via Hi Fructose

David Ellis finds ways to incorporate the environment that humanity has continuously distanced itself from and remix his own spirit back into the portrayal. Ellis builds out his signature patterns and swirls and paints himself into the work. His stereo producing trees and animals howling graphic rays depict the similarities between us and them and the free flowing necessity to engage in animalistic behavior and perhaps embrace the rhythmic, and sometimes tense dance, between what is natural and what is constructed.

Shared from www.juxtapoz.com

Yesterday marked the conclusion of the 47th annual West Indian Day Carnival — a two-mile-long Labor Day parade that runs along Brooklyn’s Eastern Parkway through Crown Heights, drawing more than 1 million performers and spectators. This year’s festivities included the usual jubilant Caribbean music and dance celebrations, as well as a special performance of the de Blasio “Smackdown.”

Shared from http://nymag.com/thecut/2014/09/bedazzled-bikinis-at-the-west-indian-day-parade.html

Olaf Breuning's ”The Art Freaks,” is a group of color photographs transposing the signature styles of seminal 20th-century artists into prosaic body painting. Both humorous and uncanny, the series not only questions our relationship to the enduring artworks Breuning chose to reference, but also to the reproductions and consumable patina through which most of us experience these artists’ works and their distinctive aesthetics.
via Metro Pictures Gallery
http://olafbreuning.tumblr.com/

Christopher Conn Askew is the creator of Sekret City, a name that Christopher says refers to the secret little city that he keeps inside. His own inner world of dreams and nightmares, desires and fears, and most of all his questions and mysteries. This city is populated by martyrs, talking animals, gods and goddesses, soldiers, whores, saints, thieves, suicides and monks. Christopher’s paintings are created with watercolor, ink and graphite for the most part. He also says that he has, in the past, used small amounts of his own blood, spit or even human ashes (not his own, yet) to complete his works.
http://www.sekretcity.com/pages/paintings

Michelle Hinebrook's paintings are infused with an understanding of optics and geometry as well as painterly intuition. Attempting to capture movement, within a deep, dynamic space with kaleidoscopic explosions of color and shape. She begins constructing compositions using a computer, ruler and airbrush, drawing hard-edge geometric shapes. She then balances these hard-edge elements with hand-drawn lines, painted fragments and loose gestures, this process reveals subtle manipulations in surface and texture.

"I’d like the viewer to have an experience of the infinite, to peer into the mysterious networks of shapes and have a moment when the borders of the painting fall away a little, leaving them in a visionary, reflective state of mind."

http://michellehinebrook.com/
Shared from www.juxtapoz.com

You’ve got to see these beautifully detailed illustrations by Clog Two for several Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle characters. This series of art is extremely awesome. I love the style of these characters, and each one features some amazing artistic details that make them pop. The characters include Leonardo, Donatello,  Michelangelo, Rafael, Splinter, Shredder, Rocksteady, Bebop, and Krang.
http://www.syonanto.blogspot.com/

Shared from www.geektyrant.com